Your AGWR reading will help here. Compose a full paragraph detailing the “rhetorical situation”(https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/625/01/) of each of these chapters from Global Woman: “Love and Gold,” “The Nanny Dilemma,” & “Global Cities.”

Your AGWR reading will help here. Compose a full paragraph detailing the “rhetorical situation”(https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/625/01/) of each of these chapters from Global Woman: “Love and Gold,” “The Nanny Dilemma,” & “Global Cities.”

There are two parts
1. Your AGWR reading will help here. Compose a full paragraph detailing the
“rhetorical situation”(https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/625/01/) of each
of these chapters from Global Woman: “Love and Gold,” “The Nanny Dilemma,”
& “Global Cities.” Who are the writers? What is their ethos/character like? What is
its purpose? Who is their audience? Write a paragraph for each chapter and post
the collection of rhetorical analyses here.
I uploaded the chapters that needed to be read
2.
You will have noticed by now how the essays collected in Global Woman revolve
around certain keywords: First world/Third world, children, and migrant, for example.
These words are not used neutrally, right?
When Hochschild talks about children in “Love and Gold,” for example, she is not talking
about just any children or children in general; she is talking about either poor or privileged
children, abandoned children, children who are sick more often than their peers and do
poorly in school, children with nannies who are taught to not ask too many questions,
children worldwide who were guaranteed certain rights to security and happiness and love
in the UN Declaration on the Rights of the Child back in 1959. Thus, “children” in
Hochschild’s hands is a loaded term: it has a specific constellation of references that define
it in terms of privilege, need, and rights. “Children,” for Hochschild, refers to young people
in grade school or younger who are either harmed because of a missing a parent or helped by
having an additional adult to care for them–all who are victims of migration patterns caused
by global capitalism. Victims of abandonment and victims of education in quietism and
unethical employment systems.
Here’s the assignment:
Select 5 terms from the essays we have read thus far in Global Woman and for each one,
track the way it is used within the essays. Try to compare one essay’s usage to that of
another. Give page numbers citing the appearances of the terms using MLA format. Come
to a conclusion about how that word is being used similarly or differently across the essays.
**Start a thread for each new term!** I expect that a lot of us will want to track similar
vocabularies, so for each of your 5 words, start a new thread for that word if no one else has
talked about it yet. And if someone has already started talking about your word, add your
own analysis to that thread. Let’s try to have a good 10-15 terms to discuss, though. If you
start posting here relatively late and see that only 7 or 8 words have been discussed, please
take responsibility to introduce some other terms for our consideration. I have gotten us
started by creating threads for some of the more obvious terms you might like to address.
Select five terms from these words: First World/Third World, Mother, North/South,
Globalization, Domestic, Care
This part does not have to belong, only a few sentences would work for each term. For
example, Mother: In “Love and Gold”, “mother” refers to a grandma, a nanny, or simply, a
mother (16). It also refers to a mother who is not home and is in another country making
money. It refers to a working First World mom who is absent most of the time. In “The
Nanny Dilemma”, “mother” refers to the same as well, a nanny or an absent mother who is
working. Woman: In the introduction, the word “woman” is used as an immigrant woman

who travels across the world to do the work of other women (3), a prostitute, with “one out
of every twenty […] enslaved” (10), a wife escaping from an abusive husband (11), or a
daughter, sister, granddaughter, niece escaping the “expectation that she care for elderly
family members” (10). Whereas in chapter 1, the word “woman” is used as a mother or
a daughter who leaves her country (south) to make money to care for her children back home,
a Third-World country or a “woman” is someone who has children (22) or a “woman” is seen as

someone who is “twenty-nine and comes from the Philippines” (21), there is also “First-
World middle-classed” women (20) who have careers with “long hours and demanding

jobs” (20).

ANSWER.

PAPER DETAILS
Academic LevelCollege (1-2 years: Freshmen, Sophomore)
Subject AreaEnglish 101
Paper Type Essay
Number of Pages2 Page(s)/550 words
Sources0
Paper FormatMLA
SpacingDouble spaced
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