Write a response of NO LESS than 300 words (one full page) connecting the presentation to concepts from the course (you can use concepts from the chapter on Race and Ethnicity, or any other concepts that seem to fit this discussion)

Write a response of NO LESS than 300 words (one full page) connecting the presentation to concepts from the course (you can use concepts from the chapter on Race and Ethnicity, or any other concepts that seem to fit this discussion)

Receive up to 5 extra credit points (to be added to your overall test score) by:

1) Attending the presentation by Moustafa Bayoumi (author of “How Does it Feel to Be a Problem?) on Thursday, Nov 20th at 7 pm in the Student Union Ballroom. NOTE: Tickets are free, but are REQUIRED. To reserve a ticket, contact the Office of First-Year Programs at 859-572-5913 or by email at cookl4@nku.edu. There will NOT be tickets distributed at the door so make sure to reserve a ticket if you plan to attend!

2) Write a response of NO LESS than 300 words (one full page) connecting the presentation to concepts from the course (you can use concepts from the chapter on Race and Ethnicity, or any other concepts that seem to fit this discussion). MAKE SURE that it is clear from your response that you attended the presentation.

Your response must be submitted to Blackboard by 11:59 pm on Monday, December 1st. Papers received after this time will not receive credit

About the book:

Just over a century ago, W.E.B. Du Bois posed a probing question in his classic The Souls of Black Folk: “How does it feel to be a problem?” he asked. Today, Arab and Muslim Americans, the newest minorities in the American imagination, are the latest “problem” of American society, and their answers to Du Bois’s question increasingly define what being American means today.

In a wholly revealing portrait of a community that lives next door and yet a world away, Moustafa Bayoumi introduces us to the individual lives of seven twentysomething men and women living in Brooklyn, home to the largest number of Arab Americans in the United States. Through telling real stories about young people in Brooklyn, Bayoumi jettisons the stereotypes and clichés that constantly surround Arabs and Muslims and allows us instead to enter their worlds and experience their lives. We meet Rasha, Sami, Lina, Akram, Yasmin, Omar and Rami and discover through them often-unseen entanglements: government surveillance and detentions, workplace discrimination, warfare in their countries of origin, threats of vigilante violence, the infiltration of spies and informants into their midst, and the disappearance of friends or family. Their richly told stories connect us to their quests for meaning, from falling in love to finding God, and we feel their triumphs and watch them stumble along the way. As their lives turn on the winds of global conflicts, these young Arab Americans manage the major issues of our day while forging the contours of our future society. What the stories in this book prove is that the fight for equality and the commitment to compassion are as necessary today as ever, if not more so.

ANSWER.

PAPER DETAILS
Academic LevelCollege (1-2 years: Freshmen, Sophomore)
Subject AreaSociology
Paper Type Essay
Number of Pages1 Page(s)/275 words
Sources0
Paper FormatMLA
SpacingDouble spaced
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