Write a literary analysis of J.M. Coetzee’s The Life and Times of Michael K that synthesizes your thinking with the secondary sources Wordsworth’s “The Leech Gatherer.”

Write a literary analysis of J.M. Coetzee’s The Life and Times of Michael K that synthesizes your thinking with the secondary sources Wordsworth’s “The Leech Gatherer.”

Essay on Michael K: Literary-Analysis in response to a question
Task: Write a literary analysis of J.M. Coetzee’s The Life and Times of Michael
K that synthesizes your thinking with the secondary sources Wordsworth’s
“The Leech Gatherer,” More details on the task of literary analysis are
posted at https://drive.google.com/file/d/
0B9nlMvrTLDZ2Z1FpVVNLZXRkTmc/edit?usp=sharing
Thesis: Write your thesis as a claim that responds to the question.
How might we regard Michael K as parallel to Wordsworth’s figure of the
Leech Gatherer? Also, if Michael K somewhat like the Leech Gatherer, then
who is like the persona Wordsworth presents, the narrator who finds the
Leech Gatherer to be of such interest? Would it be Coetzee? The medical
officer? The reader? Quote Wordsworth as needed to develop your answer,
but take care to make well more than half the essay a literary analysis of
Michael K.

The more arguable, nuanced, detailed, or daring your thesis, the greater your
potential to help other readers share a meaning they might not have
considered without reading your work, evaluating the support you offer for
your position, and attending to the voice of your writing projects.

Form of Argument: inductive structure
Counterarguments. As included in your Writer’s Outline, you should include
two counterarguments in your essay. Make one a small-scale objection to one
of your interpretations of a quote. Include the other as a larger-scale
objection to your thesis.
Audience: Write for an informed, academic audience working at the collegiate
level. Imagine comparing ideas with someone who knows the texts, has their
own ideas, and can back them up with carefully chosen passages.
VERBOTEN: Don’t quote this prompt or Wikipedia in this essay.

Quotations and Paragraph Development:
Required: Drop-In Quote. For bits of basic plot summary that set up
interpretive work, you may use a “drop-in” quotation that employs Coetzee’s
exact wording. Demonstrate this in your essay at least once. Example:
Another person arrives at the farm, “a pale plump young man in khaki
uniform,” who claims to be “boss Visagie’s grandson” (60).
§ Syntactically, the key is to use words in a way that fit your own sentence
structure.
§ In terms of your argument, it is essential not to use unexplained drop-in
quotes in support of your key claims. Try not to confuse your ability to
integrate (or drop-in) quotations fluidly within sentences with the intellectual
work of actually leveraging those quotations effectively to convince a reader
that your position is thoughtful and valid. One may certainly be successful
with the former and not the latter.
MLA paraphrase of a detail from the novel: Required. A similar tool is the
MLA paraphrase, which you can deploy to identify elements of the plot that
you wish to report in your own words, but don’t feel bear interpretation or
explanation. Show me this at least once in this essay. Example:
Michael soon learns that climbing the fence of the Jakkalsdrif camp is a
capital offense (85).
Block quotations: optional.
The following explanation of block quotations is itself an example of a
block quotation. Notice that the indentation is an entire inch, not just the
regular 1⁄2 inch one uses with a paragraph break, such as the one I placed at
the beginning of this sentence. Notice that there are no quotation marks
around the blockquote, and – get ready for it – no final period.
For quotations that are more than four lines of prose or three lines of verse,
place quotations in a free-standing block of text and omit quotation marks.
Start the quotation on a new line, with the entire quote indented one inch
from the left margin; maintain double-spacing. Only indent the first line of
the quotation by an additional quarter inch if you are citing multiple
paragraphs. Your parenthetical citation should come after the closing
punctuation mark. When quoting verse, maintain original line breaks.

ANSWER.

PAPER DETAILS
Academic LevelCollege (1-2 years: Freshmen, Sophomore)
Subject AreaLiterature
Paper Type Essay
Number of Pages4 Page(s)/1100 words
Sources2
Paper FormatMLA
SpacingDouble spaced
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